Any of my bearded brethren out there will tell you that the first question that comes out of the mouth of all those non-bearded men is, “doesn’t that itch?”

Truthfully, the answer is, “sometimes yes and sometimes no.” A beard certainly can itch, but there are measures that can be taken, and an experienced beardsman knows all the tricks of the trade.

Men like facts and the facts on this matter are that beard itching comes in phases. Men also like knowledge. After all, knowledge is power, and men like power! So, today my task will be to provide all of you manly readers with some good facts and reliable knowledge about facial hair and itching.

To adequately address this issue I will need more than a solitary blog entry, so for today we’ll keep it simple and focus on the initial itching that can emerge with the start of a new beard. Now, I know… if you’re reading this blog you’ve probably long since passed this phase in the beard growing process; you are undoubtedly sporting a majestic man mane as I type these very words. Nevertheless, don’t forget the importance of good facts and knowledge; you just never know when they’ll come in handy! So read on my hairy fellows; read on!

The fact of the matter is that when men make the mistake of shaving they typically do so with a razor, as opposed to a trimmer or set of clippers. There is a reason for this. Razors provide a closer shave. This is what they are designed for. Don’t believe me? Just watch any ad selling a new razor. It will tell you all about its patented technology that allows the hair to be lifted and cut below the skin to provide a smoother shave that lasts longer.

Well, that’s a great quality for a razor to have if a man’s intent is to keep it clean and nubile. Yet, what many men fail to realize is that a razor blade is extremely hard on the skin, pores, and hair follicle. This does damage, which is why there are so many of those after shaving products out there. Yet, as long as a man keeps shaving it clean he is unlikely to experience itching. But, once he makes the correct decision to let it grow out he will be met with new problems.

You see, as the damaged hair follicle begins to grow out of the pores on your face, it will be met with resistance. This resistance is the result of damaged hairs and clogged and damaged pores. A lot of inexperienced beardsmen will attempt to apply a lot of balms, oils, or other products to their beard in hopes of reducing the itching but, more often than not, this is a mistake when dealing with a short, new beard. Such products are actually better suited for a longer, full beard.

You see, the more product you apply to a new beard, the more likely you are to contribute to the problem itself, as the goal is to unclogged your pores so that the damaged hair can grow freely… not clog it up more!

Source - @hahajoel

Source – @hahajoel

Accordingly, the best method to fight the early phase of facial itching is threefold. Firstly, wash it regularly. If you have dry skin then a standard facial lotion is advisable, but, as noted, don’t get too carried away. You don’t want to clog the pores further. Secondly, exfoliation will help to both unclog the pores and soften the hairs. So picking up a facial wash that also functions as an exfoliator should help too. Finally, persevere! Good things are worth fighting for, and this is true when it comes to growing a beard. Beards come in many phases and stages. But, once you get through the initial growing phase, which typically only lasts a few weeks at most, the itching will subside.

Now… that’s not to say you’ll never be met with itching again, but that’s a topic for another blog. To conclude, if you ever make the mistake of shaving your beard try to avoid using a razor. A beard trimmer or a pair of hair clippers is a better option as it doesn’t cut the hair follicle below the skin. This way, once you regain your sense and decide to grow the beard back you will avoid the initial phase of itching all together.